2019 Audi TT Review, Ratings, Specs, Prices, and Photos

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The 2019 Audi TT is a style statement in coupe or convertible form that ranges from comfortable toy to rip-roaring mini-supercar. With four seats, a hatchback, and a humble VW platform, the TT may seem practical on paper, but its specs can be deceiving.

For its style, tech, and driving fun, we give it 6.2 out of 10 overall. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

For 2019, the TT is treated to a few minor tweaks and a special 20th Anniversary Edition to commemorate the original’s 1999 launch with a brown leather interior, unique wheels, and a limited production run.

Review continues below

Though not as distinctive as the original—which brought Bauhaus back in a big way—the third-generation TT is still a handsome car in either coupe or convertible form. Sharp lines, a big trapezoidal grille, the hood-mounted badge, and big wheels round out the look nicely, but this car is deceptively small for how low and wide it seems. A soft-top convertible spoils the coupe’s sleek lines slightly, but as far as roadsters go, it’s a looker.

Inside, the driver-centric cockpit eschews a central infotainment screen in favor of the all-digital Virtual Cockpit display, passengers be damned. Thoughtful touches like the vent-mounted climate controls and excellent material quality are hallmarks of Audi design, and make for one of our favorite sports car cabins.

The base TT is powered by Audi parent VW’s 2.0-liter turbo-4, which starts with 220 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque and standard all-wheel-drive. The hotter TTS model boosts the same engine to 288 hp and 280 lb-ft and drops the 0-60 mph time from 5.2 to 4.4 seconds. Hardcore performance fans will want the TT RS, which shoehorns a rip-snorting 2.5-liter turbo 5-cylinder under the hood for 400 hp and 354 lb-ft, rocketing this little coupe to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds. All TTs are capable handlers with somewhat light steering, and as letters are added to the name, grip, braking performance, and suspension firmness all increase. TT and TTS models get a 6-speed dual-clutch automatic as standard, while the RS model has one extra cog.

Space is plentiful for two occupants—though visibility is limited—and while the TT technically has rear seats, they’re for children on rare occasions or best left folded flat to increase the size of the easily accessible cargo area. Roadsters predictably offer a smaller trunk and no back seats, but the TT roadster isn’t meant to be a daily driver while the coupe could pass for one.

Standard equipment is generous, but the TT gets significantly better as you spend more on extras like Bang and Olufsen sound, navigation, and more. Unfortunately, safety tech is lacking, with no automatic emergency braking available and blind-spot monitors as optional extras. Fuel economy is strong for base models at 26 mpg combined but gets worse as power and cylinder counts increase.

 

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